Isolation an opportunity to connect with old friends

Mayfair News

Times like this are trying but there can be a silver lining in people wanting to reconnect or rekindle old friendships. Through Facebook, texting, Twitter and other means we seem to be using all the bells and whistles on our devices. And there is always the good old landline to have a conversation to reminisce about old times. We see the devastation slowly making our beautiful world a dark place to live in. From Facebook: "Fear does not stop death. It stops life and worrying does not take way tomorrow's troubles. It takes way today's peace." Makes one think.

There has not been much action in our area. The Catholic bishop stated that churches are to be open to the public for two hours a week. Our local priest, who resides in Hafford, held mass early Saturday evening to nine parishioners. It obeyed the government law of having less 10 people or less in a room. The parishioners distanced themselves.

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Mayfair's Save a Third World Child concert scheduled for April 5 was cancelled.

Look through the eyes of a newly arrived immigrant to the prairies as to how spring is unfolding. We see this marvellous unfolding every year, but somehow for me this year I am viewing things as if for the first time. I honestly appreciate everything and take more notice of the geese flying low in the sky announcing their arrival after our harsh winter. The snow is slowly melting into puddles, pussy willows are appearing, gophers are popping up and running across the roads and their is new birth among the animals.

It is a stressful time for ranchers and farmers who suffer sleep deprivation from checking barns and carrols in the wee hours.

Grain farmers have to strategize seed , fertilizer and insecticide purchases. Once the snow disappears they are getting the machines ready the seeding. Problem is, since last fall movement of grain via railroad has been slow. One often sees hundreds of oil tanker cars on the track but where are the grain cars? If farmers are having difficulty moving their commodity because of the government's lack of pipeline construction, what do you do? We have to survive, too.

Farming is a difficult way to make a living. I am a farmer and do not get a monthly cheque from my employer. Because of COVID-19, agriculture is actually going to be important to save everyone when the world needs food. Please support Canadian agriculture, buy locally when you can.

I heard on the radio because of this pandemic, the United States will not have as much food to export and our local greenhouses might have short supply of bedding plants.

Everyone seems to be listening to more music, such as jam sessions on YouTube. We can be entertained anytime of the day. Hey, this social distancing, I sort of like it.

When in Yuma, I kept busy doing what I enjoyed, live theatre. My group performed a Beverly Hillbilly comedy for the seniors in our RV park in which I played Miss Jane Hathaway. Mary from Leroy was Ellie Mae. Larry, 82 from Vancouver, B.C. portrayed Jed Clampett . Mary, 92, who played Granny, is originally from Astoria, Ore., which is actually a country, hillbilly place where she lived most of her life. Jethro,was played by 82-year-old John from New Mexico. He was a natural comedian and had the audience rolling.

It is interesting when you tell other snowbirds where you are from. I always said approximately 100 miles from Saskatoon, as most people have heard of that city. But when more thoroughly questioned, I revealed a farm near a small hamlet no one has heard of. Many people I come across are from our province and of course the conversation unravelled. I met Bruce (Audrey) Wilson from Cando who said he had a brother who was a grain buyer about 20 years ago in Mayfair.

They were vacationing at Sans End Park In Winterhaven, Calif. Brian (Christine) Wilson was an elevator agent and they had three sons. The eldest, Avery, died of a brain aneurysm at age nine and a couple years later Brian was transferred to Battleford when the Sask. Wheat Pool closed its doors in Mayfair. Many rural elevators left the prairie landscape, but thankfully local farmers bought some for grain storage. Paul and Stephen Cherwinski and Keith Liebaert are the owners of the Mayfair's old Pool elevator, which is one of the oldest buildings in Mayfair.

Thank you to all the individuals in the health-care system, essential service workers, restaurant workers and those working in grocery and pharmacy stores and banks for being there when we need you.

Take care everyone, as we are all in this battle together.

 

A comedy troupe performed a Beverly Hillbilly comedy for residents of a Yuma, Ariz. RV park. Cast members were: Mary as Ellie Mae, Larry as Jed Clampett, Mary as Granny, John as Jethro and Elaine Woloshyn as Miss Jane Hathaway. Photo submitted by Elaine Woloshyn

Isolation an opportunity to connect with old friends

 

By Elaine Woloshyn

Correspondent

Times like this are trying but there can be a silver lining in people wanting to reconnect or rekindle old friendships. Through Facebook, texting, Twitter and other means we seem to be using all the bells and whistles on our devices. And there is always the good old landline to have a conversation to reminisce about old times. We see the devastation slowly making our beautiful world a dark place to live in. From Facebook: "Fear does not stop death. It stops life and worrying does not take way tomorrow's troubles. It takes way today's peace." Makes one think.

There has not been much action in our area. The Catholic bishop stated that churches are to be open to the public for two hours a week. Our local priest, who resides in Hafford, held mass early Saturday evening to nine parishioners. It obeyed the government law of having less 10 people or less in a room. The parishioners distanced themselves.

Mayfair's Save a Third World Child concert scheduled for April 5 was cancelled.

Look through the eyes of a newly arrived immigrant to the prairies as to how spring is unfolding. We see this marvellous unfolding every year, but somehow for me this year I am viewing things as if for the first time. I honestly appreciate everything and take more notice of the geese flying low in the sky announcing their arrival after our harsh winter. The snow is slowly melting into puddles, pussy willows are appearing, gophers are popping up and running across the roads and their is new birth among the animals.

It is a stressful time for ranchers and farmers who suffer sleep deprivation from checking barns and carrols in the wee hours.

Grain farmers have to strategize seed , fertilizer and insecticide purchases. Once the snow disappears they are getting the machines ready the seeding. Problem is, since last fall movement of grain via railroad has been slow. One often sees hundreds of oil tanker cars on the track but where are the grain cars? If farmers are having difficulty moving their commodity because of the government's lack of pipeline construction, what do you do? We have to survive, too.

Farming is a difficult way to make a living. I am a farmer and do not get a monthly cheque from my employer. Because of COVID-19, agriculture is actually going to be important to save everyone when the world needs food. Please support Canadian agriculture, buy locally when you can.

I heard on the radio because of this pandemic, the United States will not have as much food to export and our local greenhouses might have short supply of bedding plants.

Everyone seems to be listening to more music, such as jam sessions on YouTube. We can be entertained anytime of the day. Hey, this social distancing, I sort of like it.

When in Yuma, I kept busy doing what I enjoyed, live theatre. My group performed a Beverly Hillbilly comedy for the seniors in our RV park in which I played Miss Jane Hathaway. Mary from Leroy was Ellie Mae. Larry, 82 from Vancouver, B.C. portrayed Jed Clampett . Mary, 92, who played Granny, is originally from Astoria, Ore., which is actually a country, hillbilly place where she lived most of her life. Jethro,was played by 82-year-old John from New Mexico. He was a natural comedian and had the audience rolling.

It is interesting when you tell other snowbirds where you are from. I always said approximately 100 miles from Saskatoon, as most people have heard of that city. But when more thoroughly questioned, I revealed a farm near a small hamlet no one has heard of. Many people I come across are from our province and of course the conversation unravelled. I met Bruce (Audrey) Wilson from Cando who said he had a brother who was a grain buyer about 20 years ago in Mayfair.

They were vacationing at Sans End Park In Winterhaven, Calif. Brian (Christine) Wilson was an elevator agent and they had three sons. The eldest, Avery, died of a brain aneurysm at age nine and a couple years later Brian was transferred to Battleford when the Sask. Wheat Pool closed its doors in Mayfair. Many rural elevators left the prairie landscape, but thankfully local farmers bought some for grain storage. Paul and Stephen Cherwinski and Keith Liebaert are the owners of the Mayfair's old Pool elevator, which is one of the oldest buildings in Mayfair.

Thank you to all the individuals in the health-care system, essential service workers, restaurant workers and those working in grocery and pharmacy stores and banks for being there when we need you.

Take care everyone, as we are all in this battle together.

 

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